Garnet Walters

Pianist Producer Teacher Composer Arranger

The Official Website of Garnet Walters and Geephlat Music
 

Thank You Harmonic Minor Scale!!

piano-scales-a-minor-harmonic

I remember as a young student how much I hated the harmonic minor scale. Why? It was that skip from the flat 6 (b6) to the major seventh (M7). I loved the sound of it but my fingers wanted to boycott that interval jump at the end. In some keys, (primarily C, D, E, F, G, A and B) the fingering was pretty straight forward and manageable. When it came to the black keys, my fingers were tangled up in knots because the fingerings were completely different. With slow practice and a lot of patience, I managed to get the scales down into all the keys.

Fast forward to 2014. I was practicing the B flat (Bb) Harmonic minor scale and the fingering that I was using felt strange. I was using the fingering that I had used as a child but something felt off. I slowed down and examined what I was doing. I was taught to start with my 2nd finger in both hands and I remembered that clearly but something still didn't feel right. I decided to go read the fingering from the Hanon book and I was right. 2nd finger on the left and right hand on the Bb. I check out another book to make sure that the fingerings were correct and to my surprise, the fingerings were different. The right hand started with the 4th finger on the Bb and the left hand started on the 2nd finger on the Bb. I tried it out slowly and I felt comfortable. No awkwardness at all! What I learned was the key to playing this scale as well as others was contingent on where the 4th finger lands.

My ring finger surely had a work out that day but I immediately saw the benefits. Usually the ring finger is the weakest finger but the harmonic minor scale kept it accountable and honest. When I started to play my other scales and lines, my ring finger kept up! So not only did I learn a new fingering, my ring finger got stronger because of it! That skip was an excercise in itself!

It's a good thing to check out alternate fingering for scales and other musical ideas. Everyone does not have the same hand or finger shape so that also needs to be considered. Experiment weird fingerings when playing scales or when you are soloing. Experiment with different fingerings when you are learning music as well. The composer may have put that fingering there for a reason. Maybe it will work for you, maybe it won't. Don't be afraid to try it out.

With that being said, I would like to thank the harmonic minor scale and its counterpart the harmonic major scale for teaching me this valuable lesson. I will never forget this!!

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